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August 4, 1991

GERALD ARMSTRONG

          Gerry Armstrong is a former archivist for the
Church of Scientology of California who, as part of his
duties, was entrusted with the care of thousands of pages
of personal records belonging to L. Ron Hubbard. In
December 1981, Armstrong left the Church, and took with
him over 10,000 pages of records belonging to Mr.
Hubbard, Mrs. Hubbard and the Church, including over
5,000 pages of original documents for which no copy was
left behind. Armstrong then turned those documents over
to attorneys representing plaintiffs suing the Church and
the Hubbards in spurious civil damages actions. The
Church and Mrs. Hubbard filed suit in August 1982 to
obtain the return of the stolen documents, and Armstrong
was required to surrender all copies of the stolen
records to the Los Angeles Superior Court for safekeeping
while the action was litigated. In June 1984, following
a six week trial in which the Court allowed Armstrong to
enter several thousand pages of the stolen documents into
evidence as support for his "state of mind," the Court
ruled that the Church and Mrs. Hubbard had proven their
cases against Armstrong for civil theft of the documents,
for breach of his fiduciary duties, and for invasion of
Mrs. Hubbard's privacy. However, in a decision which is
still on appeal, the Court also ruled that Armstrong was
justified in his actions by his fear of potential harm
from the Church.

          In August 1984, Armstrong began conspiring with
staff members of the Church whom he believed to be
disaffected with Church management. Armstrong's goal was
to overthrow existing Church management and to set up in
its place a new set of Church executives who would settle
all of the civil damages suits brought against the Church
by the attorneys representing Armstrong. Armstrong's
actions were directed by attorney Michael J. Flynn as
well as Los Angeles Internal Revenue Service Criminal
Investigations Division special agent Alan Lipkin. His
plans included planting forged incriminating documents in
Church files, to be discovered by a government raid, and
blackmailing a senior Scientologist executive through
attempted sexual entrapment. Armstrong's plans also
included the filing of a civil damages suit against
Church management and, when the Church staff member with
whom he was plotting stated that they did not have the
evidence needed for such a suit, Armstrong told the staff
member to, "just allege it." However, unknown to
Armstrong, the staff members with whom he was conspiring
were not actually opposed to Church management, and much
of his plotting was videotaped. (See Declarations of
John G. Peterson page 4 and Earle C. Cooley page 12.

          In March and April 1985, Armstrong testified at the
trial of the civil action brought against the Church of

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Scientology in Portland, Oregon by Julie Christofferson.
During that trial, the videotapes of Armstrong's abortive
conspiracy were made public. Also obtained from
Armstrong's fellow "conspirators" during that period of
time were copies of various "literary" writings authored
by Armstrong, none of which more clearly demonstrated his
state of mind than a document now known as the "pig
letter," in which Armstrong purported to describe a
dream. (See letter, page 31.)

          In December 1986, the Church entered into a
settlement agreement with Armstrong's attorneys in which
all of the cases brought by those attorneys, including
Armstrong's cross-complaint against the Church of
Scientology of California and Mrs. Hubbard, were
settled. (The sole exception to this was the suit
brought against Armstrong, which remained pending on
appeal.) One of the conditions of that settlement was
that Armstrong and his counsel surrender all of the
documents in their possession pertaining to the Church or
the Hubbards. When they did so, copies of the documents
which Armstrong had stolen from the Church in December
1981 were provided, demonstrating that Armstrong had
perjured himself numerous times throughout the history of
the litigation when he had asserted that all such copies
were surrendered to the court. (See Declaration of
Kenneth D. Long, page 33.)

ALLEGATION:

          Church management is corrupt, and commits actions
such as blackmail and extortion through the use of
confidential pastoral counseling information.

TRUE INFORMATION:

          Armstrong admitted as part of the December 1986
settlement of his case that the actions of the Church
from which his disagreements stemmed had all been
committed by the Guardian's Office, a branch of the
Church which was completely cleaned up by present Church
management. (See Declaration of Gerald Armstrong,
page 36.)

ALLEGATION:

          L. Ron Hubbard lied about his background and
history, including his record in World War II.

TRUE INFORMATION:

          Armstrong had no formal training on biographical
research, and never attempted obtain any such training.
He did not go to government agencies or the Naval
Historical Center for records regarding Mr. Hubbard or

---page break---

the ships on which Mr. Hubbard served in WW II. As a
result, he had to testify "I stand corrected" when shown
evidence from such sources regarding Mr. Hubbard's
command of a squadron of corvettes during WW II - page
38.)

          Mr. Hubbard's record, because of his assignment to
Naval Intelligence, has been "sheep dipped," meaning that
multiple copies of his service record have been created,
many of which are false, in order to facilitate his
duties. (See Declaration of L. Fletcher Prouty,
page 48.)

For Further Information Contact:

Earle C. Cooley, Esq. (617) 542-3700


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